Dagger of the Martyrs

A collaboration with New York Times bestseller Steven Savile, and the first in a new Historical Fantasy trilogy.

Set in the 14th Century in Paris and the Middle East, it is the tale of a pair of twins.

The Brotherhood is endangered, the Templars betrayed.

The Order's only hope lies with the twins, seperated at birth, raised worlds apart, but each with an unbreakable will to discover the secrets that have been kept from them.

An epic tale of betrayal and loss, of sacrifice and committment.

And of ties that, once forged, can never be broken.

DAGGER OF THE MARTYRS is a bit of a departure for me, as it's my first full length collaboration, although Steve and I have collaborated in the past on shorter works.

Steve came to me with a very detailed synopsis for a historical fantasy trilogy set in 14th Century Paris and Constantinople, and asked if I was interested in working with him on it. The idea really appealed to me, so I took first dibs at writing the draft.

The work came in at a time I needed it, just after Sue was taken very ill. It allowed me to take my mind away, to desert sands, ancient cities and Templar politics, and I had a hell of a lot of fun blasting my way through all three volumes.

Then it was over to Steve, and he's given the first book a professional going over and polish, expanding on my blood and thunder.

In this one you'll find Templars, desert caves, Parisian dungeons, swordfighting, political skullduggery, feuds both old and new and the training of a very special assassin.

THE DAGGER OF THE MARTYRS is an epic historical fantasy novel in the grand tradition of David Gemmell's Rigante and Troy novels, tinged with magic and wonder as well as the grit of war.

Plot

Forced to flee the Holy Land by cover of darkness and facing an impossible choice as the woman he loves gives birth to twins on the road, Lucian de Bologna, does the only thing he can, tearing his new family apart before the children have drawn their first breaths to scream.

The enemies are all around.

He needs to believe that mother and daughter have a better chance as far away from him and his brother knights as possible.

It should be the best day of his life. It is the worst.

He takes the boy, Aymaric, with him to the Chapterhouse in Paris, and leaves the girl, Samira, with her mother to become a daughter of the desert, begging his last friend to watch over them as they find new lives.

Children of war, the twins destinies are forever entwined.

Half a world away from each other they learn to fight, they learn guile, they dream of impossible places, of impossible things, of quests in search of meaning, and of each other.

And when they are left bereft of comfort and alone they must both learn one last thing.

How to survive.


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